The Great Antidote – Thomas Hazlett

By The CGO

Published:

On this week’s episode of The Great Antidote podcast with Juliette Sellgren, she is joined by guest Thomas Hazlett. In their discussion, Juliette and Thomas cover the Federal Communications Commission, Section 203 of the Communications Decency Act, and the ways in which government intervenes in technology.

Thomas Hazlett holds the H.H. Macaulay Endowed Chair in Economics at Clemson University, conducting research in the field of Law and Economics and specializing in the Information Economy, including the analysis of markets and regulation in telecommunications, media, and the Internet. Prof. Hazlett served as Chief Economist of the Federal Communications Commission, and has held faculty positions at the University of California, Davis, Columbia University, the Wharton School, and George Mason University School of Law. His research has appeared in such academic publications as the Journal of Law & Economics, the Journal of Legal Studies, the Journal of Financial Economics and the Rand Journal of Economics, and he has published articles in the Univ. of Pennsylvania Law Review, the Yale Journal on Regulation, the Columbia Law Review, and the Berkeley Technology Law Journal.

He also writes for popular periodicals including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Reason, The New Republic, The Economist, Slate, and the Financial Times, where he was a columnist on technology policy issues, 2002-2011. Prof. Hazlett also serves as Director of the Information Economy Project at Clemson University. He has provided expert testimony to federal and state courts, regulatory agencies, committees of Congress, foreign governments, and international organizations. His latest book, THE POLITICAL SPECTRUM: The Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology, from Herbert Hoover to the Smartphone, was published by Yale University Press in 2017.

CGO scholars and fellows frequently comment on a variety of topics for the popular press. The views expressed therein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Center for Growth and Opportunity or the views of Utah State University.